Indiana University Northwest
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Department of History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies

Department of History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies

Class Schedule

Courses

HIST-A 301 : Colonial and Revolutionary America I (023992)

Possible themes for this course include the development of British North America: the colonial origins of the revolutionary struggle in America; and finally, an exploration of the American Revolutionary era, 1765 to 1789. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 303 : The United States, 1789-1865 (023994)

This course will examine the early American republic, beginning with the Constitutional Convention and ending with the conclusion of the Mexican-American War. Topics that will be explored include the early development of the American government, the rise of the partisanship and democracy, social and economic developments, slavery, and westward expansion. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 313 : Origins of Modern America, 1865-1917 (024002)

Social, economic, cultural, and political ways in which Americans accommodated and resisted changes introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and progressivism receive special attention. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 314 : United States, 1917-1945 (024003)

Possible themes for this course include the development of British North America: the colonial origins of the revolutionary struggle in America; and finally, an exploration of the American Revolutionary era, 1765 to 1789. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 315 : Recent U.S. History (024004)

Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation after World War II, with special emphasis on the 1950s. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 317 : American Social History, 1865 to Present (024006)

Development of modern American social and intellectual patterns since 1880. Social thought, literature, science, arts, religion, morals, education. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 318 : The American West (024007)

Western expansion and development 1763-1900: economic, political, and social. Special attention to natural resources, Indian-white relations, and the role of the West in American myth and symbol. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 321 : American Social History, 1865 to Present (024010)

Ideas that have influenced American history. Image of New World to challenge of Jacksonian democracy. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 346 : American Diplomatic History (024034)

Foundations and evolution of American foreign policy with particular emphasis on the role of the United States as a world power in the twentieth centure. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 347 : American Urban History (024035)

Development of cities and processes of urbanization in United States history. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 348 : Civil War and Reconstruction (024036)

Crisis of the Union; social, political, economic, and cultural factors leading to war and their influence in the war. Reconstruction and its consequences in the South and in the nation. (Occasionally)

HIST-A 363 : Survey of Indiana History (024051)

A survey of Indiana history and culture from the original inhabitants to recent times, with emphasis on the growth of a distinctive Hoosier culture.

HIST-A 369 : Issues in Early United States History (080512)

Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in United States history to 1870. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST-A 382 : The Sixties (024062)

An intensive examination of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American society, beginning with the confident liberalism that believed the nation could "pay any price" and "bear any burden" in order to stop communism abroad and topromote reform at home, focusing on the internal contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this liberal agenda: civil rights and black power, the New Left, the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the economy, and finishing with the more conservative order that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting realities of limited national power and wealth on the one hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on the other. (Occasionally)

HIST-B 200 : Issues in Western European History (024078)

Study of analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST-B 300 : Issues in Western European History (024084)

Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary, but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST-B 304 : Postwar European Youth (085258)

In the period following the Second World War European society was rapidly remade, granting greater social, cultural, and economic autonomy to young people. Young people in Britain, France, the Germanys, and the Soviet Union created new identities for themselves that illustrated the convergence of culture and politics. This course explores the experiences of young people in the postwar era to gauge the broader transformations in contemporary European life.

HIST-B 351 : Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages (024103)

Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity, and the Germanic invasions through Charlemagne's Empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture.

HIST-B 352 : Western Europe in the High Middle Ages (024104)

Expansion of European culture and institutions: chivalry, Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic architecture, law, revival of central government. Violent changes in late-medieval Europe: overpopulation, plague, Hundred Years' War, peasant revolt, crime, inquisition, and heresy.

HIST-B 353 : The Renaissance (024105)

Italian Renaissance as a political and cultural phase in the history of Western civilization: its roots in antiquity and the middle ages; its characteristic expression in literature, art, learning; social transformations; manners and customs. Expansion of Renaissance into France, Germany, and England. (Occasionally)

HIST-B 354 : The Reformation (024106)

Economic, political, social, and religious background of Protestant Reformation; Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, and Anabaptist movements, with reference to their political and theological trends; Catholic Reformation. (Occasionally)

HIST-B 356 : French Revolution and Napoleon (024108)

Crisis of the Old Regime; middle class and popular revolt; constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of Revolution in Europe; rise and fall of the Napoleonic Empire. (Occasionally)

HIST-B 357 : Modern France (024109)

A social, political, and cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIST-B 359 : Europe from Napoleon to the First World War (024113)

Vienna settlement and period of reaction in Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial revolution; capitalism; socialist movements; unification of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism; struggles for political democracy; social legislation; imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World War I. (Occasionally)

HIST-B 361 : Europe in the Twentieth Century I (024115)

Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world.

HIST-B 362 : Europe in the Twentieth Century II (024116)

Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world.

HIST-B 391 : Themes in World History (024138)

Contemporary bibliography and interpretations of major problems in world history.

HIST-B 393 : German History from Bismarck to Hitler (024140)

Social, political, and cultural developments from the middle-nineteenth through the middle- twentieth century, including the tragic efforts of liberalism and democracy to assert themselves against the opposing forces of militarism and nationalism. (Not open to students who have had HIST B378.)

HIST-C 300 : Issues in Classical and Byzantine History (024146)

Study and analysis of the history of Greece or Rome, the history of Late Antiquity in the Greco-Roman world, or of the Byzantine Empire. Topics will vary in focus, region, and period. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST-C 386 : Greek History (024157)

Political, social, and economic developments in Greek world from age of Mycenae and Troy until Roman conquest (167 B.C.). Greek colonial world, Athens, and Sparta, career and legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic Age. Archaeology as a source for political and social history.

HIST-C 388 : Roman History (024159)

History of Roman people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D. 565), illustrating development from city-state to world empire. Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from early kingship to republican forums, finally replaced by monarchy of distinctively Roman type.

HIST-D 310 : Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (024185)

Russia on the eve of World War I; revolutions that have swept Russia; principal developments in government, economy, cultural and social life, and international policy under the Communist regime; expansion of Russian and Communist power, particularly since 1945.

HIST-D 418 : Russian and Soviet Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century (024207)

Expansion and war in Far East; World War I and revolution; international communism; interwar problems in Europe and Asia; World War II; postwar relations with China, United States, and Eastern Europe.

HIST-D 426 : History of Balkans 1914 to Present (024214)

First World War in the Balkans; politics, economies, and societies in the Balkan countries during the twentieth century; Balkan unity movements; Macedonian question; international events and World War II; rise of socialism in the region; era of Cold War and detente.

HIST-D 431 : Eastern Europe since World War II (024219)

World War II; communist movement; political, economic, and social changes; inter-bloc relationships; foreign policy.

HIST-G 200 : Issues in Asian History (024305)

Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST-G 369 : Modern Japan (024312)

Western impact and social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism and the Japanese development process. Empire, war defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth century. Japan's rise to the front rank of world economic powers after World War II.

HIST-G 385 : Modern China (024317)

A survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies.

HIST-G 387 : Contemporary China (024318)

A survey of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural, and political life in the People's Republic of China and post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989.

HIST-H 105 : American History I (024364)

Colonial period, Revolution, Confederation and Constitution. National period to 1865. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST-H 106 : American History II (024365)

1865 to present. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST-H 107 : American History: General Course III (024366)

A thematic approach to the study of American history, 1600 to the present. Each section will deal with one or more topics, according to the interests of the instructor. Topics might be, for example, a study of American character, race and ethnicity, violence, women and sexism, or mobility and change. (Occasionally)

HIST-H 113 : History of Western Civilization I (024372)

Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST-H 114 : History of Western Civilization II (024373)

Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST-H 205 : Ancient Civilization (024387)

Political, cultural, and economic development of ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome from Bronze Age to end of classical period.

HIST-H 207 : Modern East Asian Civilization (024389)

Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary consideration. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and other movements directed toward revolutionary change.

HIST-H 215 : Proseminar in History (024399)

Selected topics of history. May be taken three times.

HIST-H 219 : Origins and History of the Second World War (024403)

Nazi and fascist aggression, collective security, appeasement and outbreak of war in Europe. German blitzkrieg; Russian front; North African, Italian, and Normandy campaigns; Hitler's racial policies; Japanese-American hostility; Pearl Harbor; island hopping; the atomic bomb. Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill at Teheran, Yalta, and Potsdam. War-crime trials. (Occasionally)

HIST-H 220 : American Military History (024404)

From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to Navy, Marines, and Air Force. (Occasionally)

HIST-H 225 : Special Topics in History (024410)

Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once for credit.

HIST-H 227 : African Civilization (024412)

Introduction to African culture; African environment; early humans in Africa; precolonial history; traditional political, economic, and social systems; language, religion, art, music, literature. (Occasionally)

HIST-H 228 : The Vietnam War (024413)

Indochinese history; French colonialism; Cold War dynamics; U.S. military-political actions; domestic U.S. politics; U.S. disengagement; Indochinese and American legacies.

HIST-H 232 : The World in the Twentieth Century (024417)

Shaping of the contemporary world, with emphasis on the interaction of the West, particularly Western imperialism and Western political and social ideas, with non-Western lands. Examination of revolutionary, national, ideological, social, and/or religious movements in Japan, China, India, Mexico, Russia, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa. Today's political, social, and economic institutions.

HIST-H 260 : History of Women in the U.S. (024430)

Colonial to nineteenth century. An examination of the social, economic, and political factors that have created and re-created women's role in American history from the colonial period to the nineteenth century. (Fall)

HIST-H 262 : American Women's History: Twentieth Century (024432)

An extension of HIST H260, examines the social, economic and political issues affecting women from 1890-2000 including the rise and diversity of feminist ideology in the second half of the twentieth century. (Spring)

HIST-H 425 : Topics in History (024534)

Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit.

HIST-H 495 : Undergraduate Readings in History (024565)

Prior arrangement with individual faculty member. Faculty-supervised experience in museum work, historic preservation, historical societies, oral history, or other history- related fieldwork in private and public institutions.

HIST-J 485 : Historiography (024701)

Principles, methodology, and practice of historical study, with emphasis on the varieties of history, the writing of history, and historical literature. (Occasionally)

HIST-J 495 : Proseminar for History Majors (024702)

Selected topics of history. May be taken three times. (Fall, Spring)

HIST-K 493 : Reading for Honors (024708)

HIST-K 499 : Senior Honors Thesis (024712)

Senior-level course for honors students only. Training in research and writing, culminating inhonors thesis to be written under direction of faculty member. Oral examination over thesis conducted by three faculty members.

HIST-T 325 : Topics in History (024754)

Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from perspective of the arts and humanities. Topics will vary, but will usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST-T 425 : Topics in History (024758)

Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary, but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit.

PHIL-P 100 : Introduction to Philosophy (037717)

PHIL-P 135 : Introduction to Phenomenology and Existentialism (037729)

Existentialism as a philosophical movement founded on phenomenology. Philosophical themes and their development, applications, or exemplifications in existentialist literature. Course presupposes no particular knowledge of philosophy. Readings from some or all of the following: Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Sartre. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 140 : Introduction to Ethics (037730)

Some ancient, medieval, or modern philosophers' answers to ethical problems (e.g., nature of good and evil, relation of duty to self-interest, objectivity of moral judgments). (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL-P 150 : Elementary Logic (037732)

Development of critical tools for the evaluation of arguments. Not a prerequisite for PHIL P250. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL-P 200 : Problems in Philosophy (037737)

A study of special, experimental, or timely topics drawn from the full range of philosophical discussion and designed to engage interests unmet in the regular curriculum. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6credit hours. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 201 : Ancient Greek Philosophy (037738)

Selective survey of ancient Greek philosophy (Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle). (Annually)

PHIL-P 206 : Philosophy of Religion (037744)

A survey of the main topics in the philosophy of religion, such as arguments for or against the existence of God, divine attributes, the problem of evil, miracles, immortality, and the connection between religion and morality. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 211 : Modern Philosophy: Descartes through Kant (037746)

Selective survey of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy, including some or all of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 221 : Philosophy of Human Nature (037750)

An introductory consideration of philosophical views about the origin, nature, and capabilities of human beings and of the effect of such views on private behavior and public policy. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 246 : Introduction to Philosophy and Art (037755)

Introduction to the philosophical study of art and the relationship between art and philosophy. Topics include the nature of a work of art, the role of emotions in art, the interpretation and appreciation of art, and the way philosophy is expressed in art.

PHIL-P 250 : Introductory Symbolic Logic (037756)

Propositional logic and first-order quantificational logic. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 282 : Women in Philosophical Thought (037769)

A study of the classical and contemporary sources that influence and illustratediffering concepts of women. The aim is for students to clarify and assess the various concepts to better formulate and justify their concept of women.

PHIL-P 301 : Medieval Philosophy (037775)

A survey, including Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, Ockham, and Nicholas of Cusa. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 304 : Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (037778)

Selective survey of postKantian philosophy including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Mill. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 306 : Business Ethics (037780)

A philosophical examination of ethical issues that arise in the context of business. Moral theory will be applied to such problems as the ethical evaluation of corporations, what constitutes fair profit, and truth in advertising. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL-P 310 : Metaphysics of Existence (037784)

Topics such as existence, individuation, contingency, universals and particulars, monism-pluralism, Platonism-nominalism, idealism-realism. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 316 : Twentieth-Century Philosophy (037790)

A survey of representative philosophical approaches to problems of the present age, such as pragmatism, process and analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, neo-Marxism, and non-Western philosophy. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 334 : Buddhist Philosophy (037808)

An examination of the basic philosophical concepts of early Buddhism and their subsequent developments in India, Japan, and Tibet. Implications of the Buddhist view of reality for knowledge, the self, and ethical responsibility will be explored. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 335 : Phenomenology and Existentialism (037809)

Selected readings from Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Sartre, and others. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 339 : Contemporary Issues in Human Rights (085598)

This course examines human rights. Using the International Bill of Human Rights, concepts such as "dignity" and "respect" are applied directly to the local level. One objective is to link disagreement over rights and corresponding duties with differences in perception. Furthermore, accountability-securing measures are assessed in connection with failed state theory.

PHIL-P 342 : Problems of Ethics (037815)

May concentrate on a single large problem, such as whether utilitarianism is an adequate ethical theory or several more or less independent problems, such the nature of goodness and the objectivity of moral judgments. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 343 : Classics in Social and Political Philosophy (037816)

Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Hobbes, Locke, Hegel, and Marx. Topics include the ideal state, the nature and proper ends of the state, natural law and natural rights, the social contract theory, and the notion of community. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 346 : Philosophy and Art (037819)

Selected philosophical problems concerning art and art criticism. Topics such as the definition of art, expression, representation, style, form and content, and the aesthetic and the cognitive. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 360 : Introduction to Philosophy of Mind (037830)

Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g., thinking, volition, perception, emotion); and the mind-body problem (e.g., dualism, behaviorism, materialism). (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 371 : Philosophy of Religion (037841)

Topics such as the nature of religion, religious experience, the status of claims of religious knowledge, the nature and existence of God. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 383 : Topics in Philosophy (variable title) (037849)

An advanced study of special, experimental, or timely topics drawn from the full range of philosophical discussion and designed to engage interests unmet in the regular curriculum. (Occasionally)

PHIL-P 393 : Biomedical Ethics (037853)

A philosophical consideration of ethical problems that arise in current biomedical practice; for instance, abortion, euthanasia, determination of death, consent to treatment, and professional responsibilities in connection with research, experimentation, and health care delivery. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL-P 490 : Readings in Philosophy (037900)

Intensive study of selected authors, topics, and problems. (Occasionally)

POLS-Y 200 : Contemporary Political Topics (038973)

An extensive analysis of selected contemporary political problems. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the Schedule of Classes.

POLS-Y 205 : Elements of Political Analysis (038975)

An introduction to the major approaches to and techniques of the systematic study ofpolitics. Includes an introduction to the analysis of quantitative data. Required for majors.

POLS-Y 301 : Political Parties and Interest Groups (039002)

A presentation of the nature of political parties, social movements, and interest groups and their relationship to the process of representation. The course also includes a discussion of the structure and organization of and membership in these groups. Theories about political party activity and behavior are also evaluated.

POLS-Y 302 : Public Bureaucracy in Modern Society (039003)

Examines public bureaucracy, with special emphasis upon the United States as a political phenomenon engaging in policy-making and in the definition of the terms of policy issues. Considers the role of bureaucratic instruments in promoting social change and in responding to it.

POLS-Y 303 : Formation of Public Policy in the United States (039004)

An analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy with emphasis on Congressional policy-making, oversight, fiscal control, and political setting.

POLS-Y 304 : American Constitutional Law I (039005)

A study of the nature and function of law and the judicial process. An analysis of selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the U.S. Constitution.

POLS-Y 305 : American Constitutional Law II (039006)

A further study of the nature and function of law and the judicial process with an analysis of other important selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the U.S. Constitution.

POLS-Y 307 : Indiana State Government and Politics (039008)

A study of the constitutional foundations, political development, organization, accomplishments, and current problems of Indiana government.

POLS-Y 308 : Urban Politics (039009)

An analysis of political behavior in modern American urban communities. The course emphasizes the impact of municipal organization, city officials and bureaucracies, social and economic notables, political parties, interest groups, the general public, and protest organizations on urban policy outcomes.

POLS-Y 312 : Workshop in State and Local Government (039013)

An intensive study of administration problems such as financial administration, public health, and welfare.

POLS-Y 316 : Public Opinion and Political Participation (039017)

A study of the nature of public opinion and its impact on major domestic and foreign policy issues, of mass political ideology, of voting behavior and other forms of political participation, and of political culture.

POLS-Y 318 : The American Presidency (039019)

An analysis of the development of the Presidency and its relationship to the American political system. The course also offers a study of presidential personalities and roles, with emphasis on political leadership, and of problems of the contemporary Presidency.

POLS-Y 319 : The United States Congress (039020)

A study of the role of Congress in American national politics with emphasis on constitutional powers, organization, historical development, reform, Congressional-executive relations, policy-making, oversight, and fiscal control.

POLS-Y 335 : Western European Politics (039036)

Development, structure, and functioning of political systems, primarily in France, Italy, and Germany. Political dynamics of European integration.

POLS-Y 360 : United States Foreign Policy (039056)

Analysis of institutions and processes involved in the formation and implementation of American foreign policy. The course also offers an overview of major post-World War II U.S. foreign policies.

POLS-Y 362 : International Politics of Selected Regions (039058)

The region studied will vary with the instructor and the year. However, Latin America is often the region selected. Current information may be obtained from the Political Science faculty.

POLS-Y 366 : Current Foreign Policy Problems (039062)

An analysis of foreign policy issues and options facing the United States. Such issues and options may include totalitarianism, imperialism, terrorism, containment, diplomacy, preventive actions, and others.

POLS-Y 372 : The Analysis of International Politics (039068)

An analysis of the nature and attributes of the nation-state and of international systems. The course also includes an analysis of nationalism, imperialism, the causes of war, sovereignty, international law, inter national organizations, and major international issues.

POLS-Y 381 : History of Political Theory I (039077)

This course is not a history of political theory per se. Rather, it is an intensive study of selected works in ancient and medieval political philosophy including Plato's The Republic, Aristotle's Politics, Cicero's The Commonwealth, and St. Thomas Aquinas' The Laws.

POLS-Y 382 : History of Political Theory II (039078)

Similarly to POLS-Y 381, this course is an intensive study of selected works in political philosophy of the so-called modern philosophers. These include Nicolo Machievelli's The Prince, Thomas Hobbes' The Leviathan, John Locke's Second Treatise on Government, Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Treatise on the Origins of Inequality Among Men and The Social Contract, and Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto.

POLS-Y 383 : American Political Ideas I (039079)

American political ideas from the colonial period to the founding period.

POLS-Y 384 : American Political Ideas II (039080)

American Political ideas from the founding period to the present.

POLS-Y 385 : Comparative Politics: Europe and Canada (039081)

A comparative analysis of four European countries and Canada -four seasoned democracies and Russia, whose political system is still in flux. Emphasis is placed on the political heritage of these countries, their governmental institutions, electoral systems, political party systems, and decision-making processes.

POLS-Y 394 : Public Policy Analysis (039091)

A study of the place of theory and method in examining public policies in relation to programs, institutional arrangements, and constitutional problems. Particular reference to American political experience.

POLS-Y 398 : Internship in Urban Institutions (039095)

This option, which requires the permission of a political science faculty, provides opportunities for students to observe and participate directly in the policy-making process of urban institutions requiring the assistance of paraprofessionals. Research and written reports are required. Evaluations will be made by both the agency and the faculty advisor. Students working in city and county institutions may repeat the course for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

POLS-Y 401 : Topics in Political Science (039097)

Topic varies with the instructor and year; consult the Schedule of Classes for current information.

POLS-Y 480 : Undergraduate Readings in Political Science (039102)

Individual readings and research. No more than 6 credit hours total may be taken. May be taken only with consent of instructor.

POLS-Y 481 : Field Experience in Political Science (039103)

Open to junior or senior majors only. Political science project approved by a faculty member. Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process based upon field experience. Directed readings, field research, research paper.

POLS-Y 490 : Senior Seminar in Political Science (039108)

Required for majors in political science. Research paper on a selected topic approved by a political science faculty member required.

POLS-Y 496 : Foreign Study in Political Science (039109)

This course involves planning of research project during year preceding summer abroad. Time spent in research abroad must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by end of semester following foreign study.

POLS-Y 499 : Honors Thesis (039111)

Requires the approval of a political science faculty and departmental honors advisor.

REL-R 160 : Introduction to Religion in Culture (040475)

Traditional patterns of encounter with the sacred. Secularization of Western culture. Religious elements in contemporary American culture. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

REL-R 170 : Religion and Social Issues (040478)

Western religious convictions and their consequences for judgments about personal and social morality, including such issues as sexual morality, medical ethics, questions of socioeconomic organization, and moral judgments about warfare.

REL-R 300 : Studies in Religion (040514)

Selected topics and movements in religion seen from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. May be repeated twice under different titles. (Occasionally)

REL-R 340 : Contemporary Religious Thought (040545)

Interpretation of human destiny in contemporary religious and antireligious thought. (Occasionally)